feuille-d-automne:

Sculpting class at Matisse’s school, c. 1909.Archive photo, Paris, Matisse Archives.

feuille-d-automne:

Sculpting class at Matisse’s school, c. 1909.
Archive photo, Paris, Matisse Archives.

Saturday Aug 8 @ 12:45pm

ourmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn Monroe art by Olivia De Berardinis

Friday Aug 8 @ 08:15pm
Forgive me father for I have sinned,
I have loved a woman more desperately than I have loved God. I have looked to a woman more reverently than I have the sky. There, in the sulk of her bottom lip, I find myself talking about a heaven that only exists when she is looking at me,
father she has not been forged between the dip of my teeth, she is not my rib, or my left side, she is my entire stomach, she is my spine.
I have been searching for prayer, father but I have found that I can only say her name
Dear God, let me have her
Dear God, let her rest with me
Dear God, let the sky turn red from how we burn
The plum tree in our back garden has withered because I have not seen the sun for five days. I have been worshipping at the cradle of her hips
father, she has cleansed me with those hands and those eyes, I do not know how to turn unless it is towards her, I do not know where to go except in her direction.
Azra.T “Take Me to Church” (via 5000letters) Friday Aug 8 @ 04:30pm
allaboutmary:

The feast of the Assumption in the London Oratory.

allaboutmary:

The feast of the Assumption in the London Oratory.

Friday Aug 8 @ 12:45pm

Marilyn Monroe during the filming of Clash by Night (1952)

Marilyn Monroe during the filming of Clash by Night (1952)

Thursday Aug 8 @ 08:15pm
allaboutmary:

Hail, star of the sea, nurturing Mother of God
An 18th century engraving of the miraculous statue of Mary venerated in the pilgrimage church of Baitenhausen, Germany. The statue is venerated under the title Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

allaboutmary:

Hail, star of the sea, nurturing Mother of God

An 18th century engraving of the miraculous statue of Mary venerated in the pilgrimage church of Baitenhausen, Germany. The statue is venerated under the title Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

Thursday Aug 8 @ 04:30pm

medievalpoc:

The Drake Jewel, England (1586)

Gifted by Queen Elizabeth I of England to Sir Francis Drake (Drake is pictured with the jewel at his belt above)

From Uncommon Sense, Spring 2004 issue, no.118:

Elizabeth’s gift to Sir Francis Drake is similarly evocative: one side is a locket with a portrait of the Queen by Nicholas Hilliard with a cover featuring on the interior her avian emblem, the phoenix. A miniature portrait was the single most frequent gift given by Elizabeth I to persons she would reward. It projected her image as monarch, equipped with state clothes and regalia and asserting a personal connection with the recipient as well as a political relationship. On another occasion Elizabeth I gave Drake a second miniature portrait, in which she stood at the focus of a sunburst, to use as a hat badge. That Drake, a commoner who rose to the position of state champion on the raid to Cadiz and Vice-Admiral of the Armada, was so honored marked his extraordinary place in the world.

More fascinating to present admirers of the Drake Jewel is the other side with the intaglio cut cameo of sardonyx featuring an African male bust in profile superimposed over the profile of a European.

There is some debate whether the European is a regal woman or a Roman Briton of the sort William Camden was idealizing in his Britannia. It is not the face of any contemporary man—and certainly not Drake—for it is clean shaven.

The symbolism here operates in two registers: a general imperial iconics in which the global range of imperium is figured in the equivalent faces of the African Emperor and the English Empress. (Karen Dalton has discussed this symbolism in a recent piece in Early Modern Visual Culture, [Peter Erikson and Clark Hulse, eds., University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000].) There is also a much more pointed symbolism meant particularly for Drake. The conjoint effort of Africa and the English will liberate the world from the power of Spain. Drake’s alliance with the Cimmarroons, runaway African slaves who intermarried with Natives, in Panama in 1576 led to his successful capture of the Spanish plate train crossing Panama. This act thrust Drake onto the world stage, secured him and the crown immense treasure, and gave the English forces in the Caribbean the character of liberators.

In the West Indian invasion of 1585–1586, he planned to resurrect his alliance, as part of his design to assert English power in the Spanish main. It survived as one of the most potent scenes in the English imperial imagination, serving as the central action of the Sir William Davenant’s opera, “The History of Sir Francis Drake,” one of only two stage works permitted during the English Commonwealth, and a piece condoned personally by Oliver Cromwell, who also sought to liberate Spanish America from “tyranny & popery.” In the Americas Drake had learned the truth that Elizabeth I understood on the eastern side of the Atlantic—the defeat of Spain required a combination, and the hatred of tyranny brought together Anglo and African.

Elizabeth’s cultivation of Mulay Ahmad al-Mansur (ruler of Morrocco from 1578–1603) in an alliance against their mutual enemy, Spain, was a diplomatic correlative to the martial alliance that Drake had forged in the jungles of the isthmus.

Thursday Aug 8 @ 12:45pm
lunawoman:

Vintage postcard-etsy

lunawoman:

Vintage postcard-etsy

Wednesday Aug 8 @ 08:15pm

killerkurves:

miss-deadly-red:

Photography/Retouch: Aaron Bennett Photography
Model/MUA/Styling: MissDeadlyRed (Myself) 
Latex Design: Kaoris Latex Dreams 

**Please do not remove the Credits**

Wednesday Aug 8 @ 04:30pm

Wednesday Aug 8 @ 12:45pm
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